Many parents who take the plunge are surprised to realize that Disney World can be a fantastic place to take their special needs children. We recently saw a blog on Trekaroo that summarized some of the ways to make sure your kids have the experience of a lifetime. You can check out our favorite tips below or read the entire article.

disney-world-guest-assistance-cardBefore you leave

  • Bring a copy of your child’s diagnosis. It’s true that Disney isn’t legally allowed to ask for proof of their diagnosis, but it can give you the confidence boost you need in the event you need it.
  • Don’t over plan. Take it easy. Expect to take numerous breaks. If your child can handle more it’ll end up being icing on the cake.
  • Bring the things that make your child comfortable. This might include blankets, games, toys, or even their favorite foods.
  • Go straight to Guest Services. You’ll be able to pick up your Disability Access Service Card. The Cast Member will explain to you exactly how this works and how to best use it to your advantage. Remember that you don’t have to get into the specifics of your child’s diagnosis – but you should be prepared to let the Cast Member know what the main issues are. This lets them give you the best advice possible.
  • Go to the park you’re most excited about first. Take a look at the maps to see which parks your kids will be most interested in. The first day they’re in the parks can set the tone for the remainder of the trip.
  • Keep an eye on quiet locations. In the event of sensory overload, you’ll never be far from a quiet location. Be sure to scope out the scene to know where they are before you need them.

disabilities-disney-worldWhen you get to the park

  • Go straight to Guest Services. You’ll be able to pick up your Disability Access Service Card. The Cast Member will explain to you exactly how this works and how to best use it to your advantage. Remember that you don’t have to get into the specifics of your child’s diagnosis – but you should be prepared to let the Cast Member know what the main issues are. This lets them give you the best advice possible.
  • Go to the park you’re most excited about first. Take a look at the maps to see which parks your kids will be most interested in. The first day they’re in the parks can set the tone for the remainder of the trip.
  • Keep an eye on quiet locations. In the event of sensory overload, you’ll never be far from a quiet location. Be sure to scope out the scene to know where they are before you need them.

Of course the most important tip of all: remember to have fun! You may be surprised by how well your children handle the crowds, overload, and excitement of Disney World.